fbpx

Foxtons Data Protection Violation

At least 16,000 customers are affected after data stolen from Foxtons was found on the dark web.

Foxtons decided not to warm its customers.

If your data is involved in this privacy breach, our group action can help.

Get justice for the Foxtons data protection failure

 

In January 2021, London-based estate agent Foxtons discovered that it had experienced a huge data breach. But, despite an investigation finding 16,000 card details, addresses and correspondence related to this breach on the dark web, Foxtons did not tell its customers that criminals had accessed and exposed their data.

To date, the data found on the dark web only affects customers from before 2010, but this could be a fraction of what has been stolen from Foxtons.

The attackers claim they have released only 1% of the stolen data publicly and these criminals could be selling more recent records in secret. So the 16,000 customer records already found on the dark web could be the tip of the iceberg.

This is a serious breach of data protection law, and Foxtons’ customers should now consider a data breach compensation claim.

As Foxtons has failed to notify those involved, any customer could be part of this breach. At Keller Lenkner UK, we can help you to find out if your data has been affected.

Contact us today for a free, no-obligation, assessment of your case.

Why claim Foxtons data breach compensation?

Hold Foxtons to account for failing to protect your private information.

Receive financial compensation for your losses.

 

Force organisations to implement better data security.

A violation of customer trust

While Foxtons knew about the data violation in January 2021, it decided not to inform the potential victims.

During this time, hackers had free reign to sell and share this data and victims of the breach were not given the opportunity to adopt extra security measures to protect themselves from further theft and fraud.

This is a shocking breach of customer trust and a dereliction of duty.

JOIN THE KELLER LENKNER UK FOXTONS GROUP ACTION TO GET THE JUSTICE YOU DESERVE.

Talk to our expert data breach lawyers today on 0151 459 5980

Foxtons Data Protection Failure Timeline

  • October 2020. Foxtons Group suffered a severe data breach. The breach forced the estate agency to shut down its customer portal (MyFoxtons) temporarily. The business was also unable to access customer and landlord contact details on its systems. Foxtons claimed that only Alexander Hall, its mortgage broking business, was affected by the data breach and that no ‘sensitive data’ was stolen.
  • January 2021. Foxtons was informed that an investigation into the breach found 16,000 card details, addresses and correspondence related to this breach on the dark web, Foxtons did not tell its customers that criminals had accessed and exposed their data.
  • February 2021. The media alerted Foxtons customers to the data breach and warned that around 20 per cent of the cards found online were still active.

Latest News

WHAT IS A GROUP ACTION?

 

Find out more about making a group action claim for compensation.

WHAT DOES NO-WIN, NO-FEE MEAN?

 

What does no-win, no-fee actually mean and are there really no costs if you appoint us?

Why use Keller Lenkner UK to make a data breach, GDPR violation, or cybercrime claim?

JOIN OUR NO-WIN, NO-FEE GROUP ACTION

Your questions answered

See our answers to the FAQs we get asked about the Foxtobs data protection failure.

FAQs about the Foxtons data protection failure.

What happened in the Foxtons data breach?

In October 2020, Foxtons Group suffered a severe data breach. The violation forced the estate agency to shut down its customer portal (MyFoxtons) temporarily. The business was also unable to access customer and landlord contact details on its systems.

What did Foxtons say about the breach?

Foxtons claimed that only Alexander Hall, its mortgage broking business, was affected by the data breach and that no 'sensitive data' was stolen.

However, according to the latest media reports, the hackers stole vast amounts of personal and financial information from Foxtons, and they uploaded this data to the dark web.

Are customers at risk following the breach?

Customers are very much at risk after an investigation by iNews discovered more than 16,000 card details, addresses, and private messages, stolen from Foxtons' systems, had been uploaded to the dark web three months ago. This sensitive and private data has been viewed more than 15,000 times.

Is the Foxtons data out of date?

Unfortunately not. Analysis of the available data shows that 20% of the debit cards found on the dark web are still active and include full card numbers and personal information. What’s more, even though Foxtons claimed that the stolen data was old or incomplete, savvy cybercriminals often use partial information to help build complete data profiles on an individual. So we would argue that these customers were always at risk and should have been informed.

Am I at risk if I was a customer with Foxtons after 2010?

Yes. To date, it appears that the data found on the dark web only affects customers from before 2010, but this could be a fraction of what has been stolen from Foxtons. The attackers claim they have released only 1% of the stolen data publicly and security experts suggest that the older information – which is freely available - could be used to advertise the hack while criminals sell more recent records in secret.

How many people are involved in the data breach?

The attackers claim they have released only 1% of the stolen data publicly. So the 16,000 customer records already found on the dark web could be the tip of the iceberg.

Is my data included in the Foxtons data breach?

The attackers claim they have released only 1% of the stolen data publicly. So the 16,000 customer records already found on the dark web could be the tip of the iceberg.

What can you claim for?

 

While each case is judged on its own merits, there are some things we would typically look for when it comes to when claiming compensation following a data breach or cybercrime:

Financial losses

With stolen data, cybercriminals can make purchases using your bank and credit cards, apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and access your existing online accounts.

Distress

Cybercrime and data breaches can have a significant impact on you, both mentally and physically. They can cause or exacerbate anxiety, stress and other psychological conditions.

Loss of privacy

Your data has value, and organisations must be held to account if they fail to protect your right to data privacy.
 

How to protect yourself following a data breach or cybercrime

Protect your finances following a data breach or cybercrime
  • Contact your bank or credit card provider immediately if your financial data has been exposed.
  • Check all bills and emails for goods or services you have not ordered.
  • Check your bank account for unfamiliar transactions.
  • Alert your bank or credit card provider immediately if there is any suspicious activity.
  • Monitor your credit score for any unexpected dips.
  • Call Credit, Experian and Equifax to ensure credit isn’t taken out in your name.
  • Never provide your PIN or full password to anyone (even someone claiming to be from your bank).
  • Never been pressured into moving money to another account for fraud reasons. A legitimate bank won’t ask you to do this.
Watch out for further attacks and attempts to extract additional information from you
  • Follow the security instructions provided by the organisation that breached your data.
  • Never automatically click on any suspicious links or downloads in emails or texts.
  • Don’t assume an email or phone call is authentic just because someone has your details.
  • Be careful who you trust – criminals often use scare tactics to try and trick you into revealing your security details.
  • Know that, even if you recognise a name or number, it might not be genuine.
  • Don’t be rushed or pressured into making a decision. A trustworthy organisation would never force you to make a financial transaction on the spot.
  • Never provide your full password, pin or security code to someone over the phone (or via message). If a bank believes a transaction has been fraudulent, they will not ask for this information to cancel the transaction.
  • Listen to your instincts and ask questions if something feels “off”.
  • Refuse requests for personal or financial information and stop discussions if you are at all unsure.
  • Contact your bank or financial service provider on a number you know and trust to check if a communication is genuine.
  • Be cautious of unsolicited communications that refer you to a web page asking for personal data.
  • Don’t accept friend requests from people you don’t know on social media.
  • Review your online privacy settings.
  • Report suspected fraud attempts to the police and Action Fraud.
Put some data protection best practices in place to stop the threat from escalating
  • Register with the Cifas protective registration service to slow down credit applications made in your name.
  • Change your passwords regularly and use a different password for every account (a password manager can help with this).
  • Protect your devices with up to date internet security software.

JOIN OUR NO-WIN, NO-FEE GROUP ACTION