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Airline Data Breach Claims

Too many airlines have poor security processes that can be easily exploited by cybercriminals.

If you have been the victim of an airline data breach, we can help.

Get justice for an airline data breach violation

 

Airlines handle a lot of sensitive personal data. And it’s vital that this is kept safe. However, all too often these companies are letting customers down and there has been a massive increase in the number of attacks targeted at the scheduled passenger air transportation sector.

IF YOU HAVE BEEN A VICTIM OF AN AIRLINE DATA BREACH, WE CAN HELP YOU MAKE A NO-WIN, NO-FEE CLAIM FOR COMPENSATION.

Contact us today for a free, no-obligation, assessment of your case

Our current airline actions

British Airways plane grounded on a runway

British Airways

Almost 400,000 British Airways customers had their personal details and bank cards stolen in one of the most severe cyber-attacks in UK history. When investigating the first data failure, a second data breach was also spotted at the airline. And in a third data breach, security researchers uncovered unencrypted links within BA’s e-ticketing process.

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Easyjet data breach

Easyjet

In 2020, EasyJet admitted that, as well as the personal details of nine million customers, over 2,000 passengers had their credit card details accessed by hackers.

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Why claim Airline data breach compensation?

Hold airlines to account for failing to protect your private information.

 

Receive financial compensation for your losses.

 

Force airlines to implement better data security.

Why use Keller Lenkner UK to make a data breach, GDPR violation, or cybercrime claim?

START YOUR NO-WIN, NO-FEE AIRLINE DATA BREACH CLAIM TODAY

Your questions answered

See our answers to the FAQs we get asked about airline data breaches.

Latest News: Airline

British Airways Data Breach

Yet ANOTHER airline data breach

On 24 February 2021, SITA suffered a “highly sophisticated” attack on its IT systems. SITA stored passenger details on its servers, and some of that information may have been accessed. As a result, millions of passengers could now be compromised.

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What can you claim for?

While each case is judged on its own merits, there are some things we would typically look for when it comes to when claiming compensation following a data breach, cybercrime or other GDPR violation:

Financial loses

With stolen data, cybercriminals can make purchases using your bank and credit cards, apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and access your existing online accounts.

Distress

GDPR failures, cybercrime and data breaches can have a significant impact on you, both mentally and physically. They can cause or exacerbate anxiety, stress and other psychological conditions.

Loss of privacy

Your data has value, and organisations must be held to account if they fail to protect your right to data privacy or otherwise do not uphold your GDPR rights.
 

How to protect yourself following a data breach or cybercrime

  • Contact your bank or credit card provider immediately if your financial data has been exposed.
  • Check all bills and emails for goods or services you have not ordered.
  • Check your bank account for unfamiliar transactions.
  • Alert your bank or credit card provider immediately if there is any suspicious activity.
  • Monitor your credit score for any unexpected dips.
  • Call Credit, Experian and Equifax to ensure credit isn’t taken out in your name.
  • Never provide your PIN or full password to anyone (even someone claiming to be from your bank).
  • Never been pressured into moving money to another account for fraud reasons. A legitimate bank won’t ask you to do this.
  • Follow the security instructions provided by the organisation that breached your data.
  • Never automatically click on any suspicious links or downloads in emails or texts.
  • Don’t assume an email or phone call is authentic just because someone has your details.
  • Be careful who you trust – criminals often use scare tactics to try and trick you into revealing your security details.
  • Know that, even if you recognise a name or number, it might not be genuine.
  • Don’t be rushed or pressured into making a decision. A trustworthy organisation would never force you to make a financial transaction on the spot.
  • Never provide your full password, pin or security code to someone over the phone (or via message). If a bank believes a transaction has been fraudulent, they will not ask for this information to cancel the transaction.
  • Listen to your instincts and ask questions if something feels “off”.
  • Refuse requests for personal or financial information and stop discussions if you are at all unsure.
  • Contact your bank or financial service provider on a number you know and trust to check if a communication is genuine.
  • Be cautious of unsolicited communications that refer you to a web page asking for personal data.
  • Don’t accept friend requests from people you don’t know on social media.
  • Review your online privacy settings.
  • Report suspected fraud attempts to the police and Action Fraud.
  • Register with the Cifas protective registration service to slow down credit applications made in your name.
  • Change your passwords regularly and use a different password for every account (a password manager can help with this).
  • Protect your devices with up-to-date internet security software.

START YOUR NO-WIN, NO-FEE AIRLINE DATA BREACH CLAIM TODAY